The role of dose fractionation in the level of Radiation- Induced Bystander Effect in QU-DB Cells

Document Type: Conference Proceedings

Authors

1 Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

2 Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran Medical Physics Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

3 Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Abstract

Introduction: Radiation effects induced in non-irradiated cells are termed radiation- induced bystander effects (RIBE). The present study intends to examine the RIBE response of QU-DB bystander cells to first, second and third radiation fractions and compare their cumulative outcome with an equal, single acute dose.
 
Materials and Methods: This experimental study irradiated three groups of target cells for one, two and three times with 60Co gamma rays. One hour after final irradiation, we transferred their culture media to non-irradiated (bystander) cells. We used the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay to evaluate RIBE response in the bystander cells. The numbers of micronuclei generated in bystander cells were determined.
Results: RIBE response to single acute doses increased up to 4 Gy, then decreased, and finally at the 8 Gy dose disappeared. The second and third fractions induced RIBE in bystander cells, except when RIBE reached to the maximum level at the first fraction. We split the 4 Gy acute dose into two fractions, which decreased the RIBE response. However, fractionation of 6 Gy (into two fractions of 3 Gy or three fractions of 2 Gy) had no effect on RIBE response. When we split the 8 Gy acute dose into two fractions we observed RIBE, which had disappeared following the single 8 Gy dose.
Conclusion: The impact of dose fractionation on RIBE induced in QU-DB cells depended on the RIBE dose-response relationship. Where RIBE increased proportionally with the dose, fractionation reduced the RIBE response. In contrast, at high doses where RIBE decreased proportionally with the dose, fractionation either did not change RIBE (at 6 Gy) or increased it (at 8 Gy).

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